Renk

I stepped off the plane and scrunched my eyes to adjust to the glaring sun. The men on the plane had pushed themselves passed the women to disembark first and now stood waiting at the bottom of the stairs for their bags. The wind was hot. Even in this season, the cool season, the temperature is regularly in the mid-thirties. Partnered with the warm wind, it certainly felt like at least 35`C. Several 4×4 vehicles were randomly parked around the airstrip; a dusty and bumpy landing zone. We spotted the Medair truck and made our way over to it with our backpacks hanging off our shoulders. Aida, the programme support manager (PSM) from Uganda, was there to welcome us to Renk. This was my first field visit.

Renk Market

I travelled to Renk, a county in the far north of South Sudan near the border with Sudan, with communications officer Diana, and two videographers, Andres and Ninja. We are filming and conducting interviews to create several videos for Medair’s internal and external use. This was Diana’s last field trip and my first and it was a privilege and a relief to travel with her.

Renk is a broken town displaying signs of a once busy and bustling centre and an extroverted market. Between the war with Sudan and the civil war in South Sudan, Renk has been battered and hosts both South Sudanese internally displaced people (IDPs) and Sudanese refugees. There are few government services available, including health care, and many military checkpoints. The community is visibly poor and yet striving for peace and stability.

Medair provides health and nutrition, and water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) services to the people of Renk county. We operate several clinics and manage mobile nutrition and health teams around the area who visit the remote villages sprinkled around the Nile River. A Medair clinic, located in the Abayok IDP camp, serves thousands of people. Abayok clinic has a 24-hour stabilization centre for children and a 24-hour reproductive facility for women. Other services include treatment for malaria, cholera, diarrhea, wounds, and respiratory and skin infections. The nurses and medical assistants are from South Sudan and graciously care for their own people.

A nurse weighing a new admission to Abayok clinic | Medair doctor, Jimmy

The stabilization centre at Abayok clinic hosts 14 beds in three different areas. There is no electricity and no running water. You would be forgiven for not identifying it as a medical facility. The walls are constructed of mud and straw and the roof tin. The beds are surrounded by essential mosquito nets. The stabilization centre is designed for children and for the mothers who bring them and stay with them. The days are long and the silence only punctuated by the cries of hurting babies. In these difficult circumstances, the Medair team provides genuine compassion and vital care.

The children in the stabilization centre are there for a variety of sad and preventable reasons. Most have some form of malnutrition and then illnesses associated with the condition. The children are weighed daily and are required to gain an additional 20g per day for several days to be released. Some of the children were looking stronger and preparing for departure but others looked dreadfully unwell.

One little boy captured my attention. He was maybe 18 months old and had a severe skin infection. Much of his skin had naturally peeled from his little body revealing excruciatingly raw skin below. He lay naked next to his mother and slept most of the time. His breathing was heavy as if he was trying to control the pain. I stared at this child and internally wept for his suffering and felt the anger rise within me as I mulled over the fact that his illness was entirely caused by powerful men playing games with their people. The food insecurity in South Sudan is a result of the conflict and not the weather. The men managing the violence are to blame for the state of these children.

Next week I travel to Aweil where Medair is responding to a severe nutrition crisis. My heart is sore and my disdain for injustice acute but I will endevour to connect with the people and share their stories.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Renk

  1. Your blog brings tears to my eyes. As I look deeply at the photos of these children I am struck at know much our Father tenderly loves EACH individual child. He has created them to be loved and nurtured, not to be victims of power hungry men.  I think our grinding is very blurred here in the west when we hear the terms “famine” and “hundreds of thousands”. Your pictures bring it into focus. Each one an individual…. I sense your godly hatred of the injustices and megalomania that creat such suffering.  Oh God have mercy. Thank you Sarah for what you are doing on their behalf…. Many blessingsLois

    Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

  2. Heartbreaking to read…although “knowing” about these tragedies, your words and pictures bring them so much closer..tHank yo so much for all you are doing..blessings to you, and to those you are helping,,perhaps a few messages to national media too?
    all very best indeed, Sarah

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s